SAE London lecturer Jamie Stonehouse is trailblazer in Interactive Audio research

07 Oct 2019

SAE London lecturer Jamie Stonehouse is currently working towards the completion of his Interactive Audio PhD, which he has been working on for the last four years. 

His end goal is to obtain a doctorate in video game audio and secure additional funding to start a research group on all things interactive audio. 

In January, Jamie presented at the University of Sheffield’s BFE / RMA Research Students’ Conference, doing an interactive demonstration showing how to use video game engines to explore / create musical compositions. 

Jamie said: “Video games are still perceived as commercial/entertainment applications and are often considered unworthy of Postgrad research. Overcoming this is an ongoing struggle, constantly defending my position and presenting at numerous conferences around the UK of the importance of creating divergent experiences in art. Slowly but surely the academic community is beginning to grasp the importance.”  

   
 

"VIDEO GAMES ARE STILL PERCEIVED AS COMMERCIAL/ENTERTAINMENT APPLICATIONS AND ARE OFTEN CONSIDERED UNWORTHY OF POSTGRAD RESEARCH."

- JAMIE STONEHOUSE, SAE LONDON AUDIO PRODUCTION LECTURER

   

 

Jamie grew up fascinated with Audio, and in the age of the C90 cassette tape, he used to wind his sisters up by splicing their favourite Paul Young album up to create something new. It’s this early experience that ignited his passion for fusing ideas and creating exciting sounds, always with emotion, energy and child-like wonder. 

If you’re also interested in interactivity in art then Jamie recommends that you explore using game engines to create interactive experiences, attend conferences and play with sound toys on the internet. He said: “Interactivity in art is nothing new but using them in the entertainment industry is. The video game industry is currently going through a renaissance in academia as film did around 30 years ago.” 

SAE students get a chance to play around and create interactive audio as part of the Game Audio module. Students such as Mike Rawcliffe and Neil McKeown enjoyed learning about interactive audio so much that they decided to pursue the subject for their Major Projects.

Mike said: “Interactive and adaptive audio gives you a whole new dimension to work with, allowing you to create something that doesn’t conform to a linear pattern. This really broadens the horizons for any form of media and offers endless possibilities for any artist to explore.”  

We wish Jamie all the best of luck with the completion of his PhD, and are already seeing the effects of his enthusiasm for the subject of interactive audio on students at SAE. 

Visit Jamie’s website to find out more about his research and projects.

  STUDY AUDIO